Quick Answer: Why Is Stonehenge Special?

What is the story behind Stonehenge?

Built in several stages, Stonehenge began about 5,000 years ago as a simple earthwork enclosure where prehistoric people buried their cremated dead.

The stone circle was erected in the centre of the monument in the late Neolithic period, around 2500 BC..

What is Stonehenge like today?

The first major construction at Stonehenge was a circular ditch, with an internal bank and a smaller external bank, built about 3000 BC. Today the ditch and inner bank are visible as low earthworks in the grass, but the outer bank has largely been ploughed away.

What are 3 interesting facts about Stonehenge?

10 Facts About StonehengeIt is really, really old. … It was created by a people who left no written records. … It could have been a burial ground. … Some of the stones were brought from nearly 200 miles away. … They are known as “ringing rocks” … There is an Arthurian legend about Stonehenge. … The body of a decapitated man was excavated from the site.More items…•

How did ancients lift heavy stones?

“For the construction of the pyramids, the ancient Egyptians had to transport heavy blocks of stone and large statues across the desert,” the university said. “The Egyptians therefore placed the heavy objects on a sledge that workers pulled over the sand.

How did they lift the stones at Stonehenge?

Humans could have quarried the site and dragged the blocks on wooden rafts. Or a giant glacier may have chiseled off the blocks and ferried them about a hundred miles (160 kilometers) toward Stonehenge, with humans dragging them the rest of the way.

Is Stonehenge a wonder of the world?

Stonehenge is one of the best known ancient wonders of the world. The 5,000 year old henge monument became a World Heritage Site in 1986. Despite numerous theories, no-one knows for certain the reason why Stonehenge was built. The stones that form the inner ring came from the Preseli Mountains in Wales.

Why is Stonehenge roped off?

As visitorship increased, the grass in the center of the stones died from being trampled by 815,000 people each year. In 1977, the stones were roped off so people couldn’t climb on them any longer.

Do you have to pay to enter Stonehenge?

It is free for people purchasing tickets to enter Stonehenge, there is a charge if you are not. Tour buses have their own separate coach park. … To enter the Stonehenge Exhibition at the Visitor Centre you need a full ticket to Stonehenge, anyone can access the café, gift shop and toilets though, for free.

How many stones remain at Stonehenge?

There are 93 rocks or lumps of stone visible at Stonehenge now – not counting the buried and missing ones. All the stones are numbered on standard plans, see below.

Is Stonehenge worth the trip?

The site does have a curious history, it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it’s very easy to get to from London. … However, I wouldn’t recommend making a visit to Stonehenge the only motivation for a day trip from London. Pair it with Bath or Salisbury or another place of interest to make it worth your time.

What is Stonehenge used for today?

Today, Stonehenge is used by pagan religions which have some similarities. Druids often use Stonehenge for formal ceremonies, normally long before the tourists arrive. Nobody knows for sure what Stonehenge was used for; that is part of the appeal and fun of visiting Stonehenge.

Are you allowed to touch Stonehenge?

Stonehenge is protected under the Ancient Monuments and Archaelogical Areas Act and you must adhere to the regulations outlined in the act or face criminal prosecution. No person may touch, lean against, stand on or climb the stones, or disturb the ground in any way.

Are the stones at Stonehenge original?

Experts have known for some time that the smaller bluestones of the 5000-year-old Neolithic monument were brought 140 miles from the Preseli Mountains in Wales. The source of the Stonehenge stones was first determined in the early 1920s by H.H. Thomas, an officer with the Geological Survey of England and Wales.

Where are the stones from Stonehenge from?

According to the established wisdom for some 90 years, many of the smaller rocks making up Stonehenge come from the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire, Wales. In 1923, geologist Herbert Henry Thomas first identified an outcrop known as Carn Meini as the source of the spotted dolerite bluestones used to build Stonehenge.